Visiting a Roma school

About a month ago, my school officially opened our newly renovated first floor classrooms. Thanks to funds from the America for Bulgaria Foundation, eight new classrooms were outfitted with fantastic new technology. The smart boards, laptops, speakers, and rentable tablets are giving teachers new resources to teach and students new ways to engage with material. My school had a big ribbon cutting ceremony which was followed by a “showcase lesson” to demonstrate the usefulness of our new technology.

Two of my wonderful colleagues and I conducted a class on leadership with our 8th graders. My students did a wonderful job handling the added pressure of lurking government officials, education ministers, and America for Bulgaria representatives. After the lesson, an education official in my region named Diana approached me, and asked if I’d be interested in visiting a nearby primary school that would love to meet an American. I readily accepted her offer after learning that she worked for Parallel Silistra, an organization dedicated to “community development in the fields of respect for human rights and gender equality, European integration and international cooperation, economic development and promoting economic activity, environmental protection, sustainable development and educational activities.” We exchanged contact information, and agreed to solidify a date to visit the school in the near future.

A couple of weeks later, I met up with Diana and her friend Valo after a day of teaching, and headed to the nearby town of Alfatar. Now at this point, it’s important to give you a little more information about Alfatar and its inhabitants. Situated about 20 kilometers outside of Silistra, Alfatar has a largely “Roma” or “Gypsy” population. The Roma constitute a sizable minority in Bulgaria (and much of EU, for that matter), and unfortunately they typically have the lowest socioeconomic status in the country. Now the cause of that low status varies greatly depending on who you ask. From my experiences, the average Bulgarian will tell you that Gypsies are “lazy moochers who aren’t interested in working or contributing to society in any meaningful way.” Others would argue that the Roma population has been ostracized by society, which has caused their current living situation and prevented them from improving it. Regardless of the causes, it’s overwhelmingly obvious that many Roma people live tough lives, and have not managed to mesh with Bulgarian society.

Unfortunately, most of the momentum to integrate the Roma vanished after Bulgaria achieved European Union (EU) status back in 2007. This is because to become a member state, countries hopeful to join the EU must demonstrate a commitment to protecting the rights of minorities. Once member status is achieved, that motivation vanishes.

Having heard so much about the Roma population, I was eager to visit Alfatar so I could further develop my own impressions. As we pulled up to the school, it was immediately apparent that money was tight. While the language school where I work had just been outfitted with smart boards and laptops, there was a noticeable lack of technology and resources in Alfatar. I appreciated the creative lengths teachers had gone to to offer an attractive learning atmosphere for the students. Elaborate designs pieced together from bright construction paper adorned the walls, creating a happy, upbeat environment.

Overview class 2

Teachers welcomed us at the door, and students offered us a bread roll filled with Bulgarian сирене cheese–as we entered their classroom. The topic for the lesson was “introducing your family,” with the underlying goal of showing acceptance to people of all backgrounds…pretty heavy (but important!) stuff for a group of 1st graders! The teacher started the lesson by showing pictures of people from around the world wearing cultural clothing. The conversation focused on the differences between traditional Bulgarian and Indian outfits.

culture difference

Now it was time for the students to introduce their families. One by one, they explained pictures of their families while the teacher walked the photos around the room for everyone to see. The students were interested, and had many questions about where the photos were taken and who they were looking at. A few kids in particular were so excited, they could hardly stay in their seats!

family pictures

I was a little nervous when my turn came around as I’d be speaking entirely in Bulgarian! Fortunately, my practice sessions with Krassy and my Skype lessons paid off, and I was able to explain my pictures, and field a range of questions. The class was especially amused when a young boy asked if I was married, and I responded: “No, are you?” They thought that was hilarious. If only my audience back home was as easy to please with my sense of humor!

Sharing family picture

Our next activity was to draw/color a “class mom.” Essentially, we worked together in two groups to create a mother’s face that incorporated characteristics from all of our mothers. I got to show off my artistic talent by drawing the ears on the portrait in the first picture below (sorry, Mom). When he saw what I drew, one of the kids literally put his head in his hands and sighed, deeply disappointed in my failed attempt. Fortunately, everyone else just thought it was funny and the kid who drew the lips made me look like Rembrandt.

Me with portrait ears Me with portrait 2

After the class, the teachers and the school director all met over tea and cookies. They explained their current financial situation and the pressure it was putting on their resources and programming. I felt really bad for them as they described countless efforts to apply for grants, only to be turned down time and time again. Their clear commitment and dedication had yet to pay off, and that can be incredibly frustrating. To be honest, it was unclear to me why I was involved in the roughly 45 minute meeting. It almost seemed as if they expected me to have a solution or connection for them to take advantage of. After hearing their story, I was disappointed that I couldn’t do more. As we said our goodbyes, I agreed to return for another guest lesson, and I’m hoping to fulfill that promise in March.

I find myself growing increasingly interested in and troubled by the issues plaguing the Roma communities in Bulgaria, and think it’s a cause that needs substantial attention. I often find myself challenging Bulgarian opinions when I hear about “lazy” or “dangerous” Gypsies. I do worry, however, that the situation will not improve until the Roma have access to and take advantage of educational opportunities. I know several of my Fulbright ETA colleagues are passionate about this issue (and even working to combat it), and I’d love to hear some of your thoughts below if you read this!

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4 thoughts on “Visiting a Roma school

  1. Thanks for the comment, Sarah! When I discuss this with students (I’d say that’s where it comes up the most), I typically try to ask questions that challenge their line of thinking. “Do you think they are actually lazy or that society has shunned them?” When I’m told that Roma don’t care about getting an education, I like point out that many Roma are intentionally placed in schools for children with mental handicaps even when they don’t have them, or that sometimes in poor communities (Roma, or otherwise around the world) families depend on children to help provide for the family in the short-term, which means school is not an option. I also always reaffirm my belief that being lazy or dangerous is a function of character, not ethnicity. In any ethnicity, you’ll find people who are lazy and people who are hard working.

    I don’t think there’s a right way to handle those sorts of situations, and my responses certainly aren’t perfect. I’m curious to hear if you or others have found anything that works well?

    Like

  2. Pingback: The Balkan Sprint | I'm Balkan on Sunshine

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